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Adaptive Diagnostic System Demonstration Project
Report Number: IDEA-02
The project developed a programmable PC-based tester with artificial intelligence capabilities for maintenance troubleshooting of electronic systems in transit equipment. The general system-level software and the neural network diagnostic subsystem originally proposed and designed had to be reassessed in view of the new advances in hardware and software and the results of system development and testing tasks. This led to several changes in the original work plan, which included using the preamp circuit rather than the XA-3 board as the focus of additional neural network testing and evaluation, changing the software to incorporate the Windows 95 operating system, and using and incorporating an improved test executive subsystem.
Print copy not available
Analyzing the Costs of Operating Small Transit Vehicles
Analyzing the Costs of Operating Small Transit Vehicles
Report Number: R-061
This User's Guide explains the accompanying Small Transit Vehicle economics (STVe) model -- a tool designed for transit planners and others making decisions about the purchase of small transit vehicles for different services and operating environments. The User's Guide describes how to run the model and interpret its results.
Print copy not available
Assessment of Hybrid-Electric Transit Bus Technology
Assessment of Hybrid-Electric Transit Bus Technology
Report Number: R-132
This report explores decision-making guidelines coupled with a comprehensive life cycle cost (LCC) model designed to assist transit managers in evaluating, selecting, and implementing hybrid-electric technology options for transit buses. The LCC model allows the user to compare the total life cycle costs across several cost categories for up to 6 different purchase scenarios. The LCC model is contained on the accompanying CD-ROM (CRP-CD-71), with the printed version of the report and available for download as an ISO image online.
Assessment of Rear Facing Wheelchair Accomodation on Bus Rapid Transit
Assessment of Rear Facing Wheelchair Accomodation on Bus Rapid Transit
Report Number: IDEA-38
This report evaluates rear facing wheelchair securement for Bus Rapid Transit and investigates wheelchair and wheelchair-user response to this method.
Print copy not available
Automatic Data Collection on Transit Users Via Radio Frequency Identification
Automatic Data Collection on Transit Users Via Radio Frequency Identification
Report Number: IDEA-10
A prototype radio frequency identification (RF/ID) tag system was designed and tested. Hardware and software were designed for an RF/ID tag system for automatic data collection on transit user movements. Work on Stage 1 involved assessing the RF/ID design for applicability to transit systems. Transit operator configuration requirements were evaluated, software and database requirements were reviewed, a preliminary system design configuration was established, and a representative bus route was selected. In Stage 2, system hardware and software specifications were developed, and a prototype RF/ID system for collecting, storing, and translating transit data was designed and built. The University of Virginia Transportation Services (UTS), which serves the student and staff population at UVA, participated in the project. In Stage 3, trial testing of RF/ID system using the Hereford College Dormitory-Hospital Complex route in the UTS system was performed and system performance and operational viability were ascertained. Potential coupling of RF/ID data collection with AVL systems was examined.
Print copy not available
AVL Systems for Bus Transit
AVL Systems for Bus Transit
Report Number: S-024
This synthesis will be of interest to transit agency general managers, bus operations, planning, scheduling, safety, and procurement staff, as well as agency communications and engineering staff. It addresses various aspects of developing and deploying automated vehicle location ( AVL) systems over the last 20 years. Current practice, AVL architecture and technologies, and the institutional context of AVL defined in terms of funding, justification, staffing and procurement are discussed. This report of the Transportation Research Board describes the different approaches to AVL deployment used at selected transit agencies. It attempts to define the role of AVL for bus transit by examining objectives of implementation and both technological and operational frameworks.
Print copy not available
AVL Systems for Bus Transit:  Update
AVL Systems for Bus Transit: Update
Report Number: S-073
This publication explores the uses of computer-aided dispatch/automatic vehicle location (CAD/AVL) systems in fixed-route and demand-responsive services (bus AVL), as well as changes in agency practices related to the use of AVL systems.
Bandwidth Expansion and Real-Time Surveillance for Security on Transit Buses
Bandwidth Expansion and Real-Time Surveillance for Security on Transit Buses
Report Number: IDEA-37
The purpose of this project was to develop a real-time video surveillance technology for enhanced security on transit buses.  The system uses digital cameras on buses, and adds a broad-bandwidth wireless network modem and software to expand the bandwidth for the wireless transmission of streaming digital video.
Print copy not available
Bus Operator Workstation Evaluation and Design Guidelines
Bus Operator Workstation Evaluation and Design Guidelines
Report Number: R-025
This report will be of interest to transit managers, bus specification engineers, bus manufacturers, and bus operator workstation component manufacturers concerned with improving the ergonomic design of the bus operator workstation to improve bus operator comfort, and reduce bus operator injuries and related absenteeism and workers' compensation claims. The report provides scientifically validated design guidelines that ergonomically accommodate operators from the 5th percentile female to the 95th percentile male population. The design guidelines address all aspects of the bus operator workstation including the seat, steering assembly, pedals, instrument panels, farebox, and other equipment. While attempting to minimize the amount of required component adjustability to contain cost, adjustment is included in several key components including instrument panels, seat, and steering assembly. It is estimated that the workstation improvements identified in the design guidelines would increase the price of a standard transit bus by approximately $6,000, with a payback period of between 3.5 and 8 years based on direct cost savings associated with estimated reductions in bus operator injuries. Indirect cost savings such as the need for fewer replacement operators would further reduce this payback period.
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CD-ROM ParaSPEC Software
Report Number: ParSPC-1
CD-ROM ParaSPEC Software
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