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Analyzing the Effectiveness of Commuter Benefits Programs
Analyzing the Effectiveness of Commuter Benefits Programs
Report Number: R-107
This report is designed to help employers, transit agencies, and other organizations that promote transit benefits, and policy makers better understand the impacts of a transit benefits program and how to qualify these impacts for their own programs.  The report has three chapters: Chapter 1 provides an overview of commuter benefits and a discussion of the study objective and the organization of the report. Chapter 2 provides guidance on how to evaluate the effectiveness of a transit benefits program. Chapter 3 based on research from metropolitan areas across the United States, examines the effects of transit benefits programs on employee travel behavior and on transit agency ridership, revenues, and costs.
Assessment of Hybrid-Electric Transit Bus Technology
Assessment of Hybrid-Electric Transit Bus Technology
Report Number: R-132
This report explores decision-making guidelines coupled with a comprehensive life cycle cost (LCC) model designed to assist transit managers in evaluating, selecting, and implementing hybrid-electric technology options for transit buses. The LCC model allows the user to compare the total life cycle costs across several cost categories for up to 6 different purchase scenarios. The LCC model is contained on the accompanying CD-ROM (CRP-CD-71), with the printed version of the report and available for download as an ISO image online.
Assessment of the Economic Impacts of Rural Public Transportation
Assessment of the Economic Impacts of Rural Public Transportation
Report Number: R-034
Almost 1,200 public transportation systems now exist in rural communities across the United States and receive Federal funding. Many of these systems have been in operation since the 1970s and 1980s, but their economic impacts have seldom been quantified. This report examines the economic impacts of selected rural public transportation services at the local level through case studies, and it estimates the national economic impact of rural public transportation on an average annual per county basis. This report will be of interest to state and local transportation planners, analysts, and decision-makers to assist them in matters pertaining to the introduction and expansion of public transportation services in rural areas.
Print copy not available
Balancing Infrastructure Reinvestment with System Expansion
Balancing Infrastructure Reinvestment with System Expansion
Report Number: RRD-092
This report explores how public transport agencies in Australia are balancing the need to increase capacity and expand service while maintaining and upgrading their existing bus, tram, rail, and ferry infrastructure.
Publication image unavailable
Building a Sustainable Workforce in the Public Transportation Industry - A Systems Approach
Report Number: R-162
This report provides a guidebook that addresses contemporary issues in workforce development, retention, and attraction, and public transportation image management. The guidebook provides practical tools to transit agencies on a variety of workforce issues including workforce strategies that enhance organizational processes, performance metrics to evaluate the impact of workforce strategies, image management techniques that improve perceptions of the public transportation industry, and benchmarking processes that allow for continuous organizational improvement.
Bus Use of Shoulders
Bus Use of Shoulders
Report Number: S-064
This synthesis documents and summarizes transit agencies' experiences with policies and regulations that permit buses to use shoulders on arterial roads or freeways to bypass congestion either as interim or long-term treatments. Both the transit and highway perspectives are explored. The purpose is to identify and obtain information and experience about jurisdictions that allow bus use of shoulders and about how jurisdictions have considered, but have not implemented, these treatments and the reasons why. This topic will be of interest to transit agency and highway organization staff responsible for bus use of shoulders.
Car-Sharing: Where and How it Succeeds
Car-Sharing: Where and How it Succeeds
Report Number: R-108
Car-sharing is an innovative mobility option that allows individuals to pay for and use automobiles on an as-need basis through membership programs.  This report is a substantive resource with considerable information and useful tools for the development and implementation of car-sharing serivces.  It would be of interest to individuals, organizaitons, and communities who are interested in knowing more about car-sharing and to those who may want to introduce car-sharing as a new mobility alternative.
Publication image unavailable
Common Sense Approaches for Improving Transit Bus Speeds
Report Number: S-110
This report explores approaches transit agencies have taken to realize gains in average bus speeds. It also identifies metrics pertaining to measures such as changes in travel speed and its components, operating cost, and ridership. It shows the results of each or a combination of approaches implemented.
Current Practices in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Savings from Transit
Current Practices in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Savings from Transit
Report Number: S-084
This report explores the role of transit agencies in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and examines the current practice of a sample of transit agencies.
Customer Satisfaction Index for the Mass Transit Industry
Customer Satisfaction Index for the Mass Transit Industry
Report Number: IDEA-01
A Transit IDEA product report, "Customer Satisfaction Index Developed and Trial Tested in Five Transit Districts to Provide Uniform Yardstick for Measuring and Comparing Customer Satisfaction with Mass Transit," was released in June 1995. The project tested the application of a customer satisfaction index (CSI) process in five selected cities, i.e., Akron, Chicago, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, and Portland, and developed guidelines for nationwide adoption of the method. Stage 1 activity established the applicability of the CSI method to monitor and improve transit customer satisfaction for five individual transit agencies through trial data collection and refinement of the CSI process. About 1,000 telephone interviews were conducted in the five test cities. The data were analyzed to determine factors that most influence overall customer satisfaction and to establish the weight of each factor. The analysis identified factors most closely related to overall satisfaction for bus service, light rail, and heavy rail transit. In Stage 2, application of the CSI method in the five test cities was analyzed and assessed. The performance of each individual transit agency based on the factors that most influence customer satisfaction was evaluated.
Print copy not available
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